Archive for the ‘Boogaloo’ Category

Funky16Corners Radio v.79 – Positive Vibrations

January 17, 2010

Example

Funky16Corners Radio v.79 – Positive Vibrations!

Playlist

Lionel Hampton – Greasy Greens (Glad Hamp)
Jack Wilson feat Roy Ayers – Sidewinder (Vault)
Freddie McCoy – Peas and Rice (Prestige)
Jack Brokensha and the Baroqe-a-delics – Boogaloo (Contrast)
Bobby Hutcherson – Goin’ Down South (Blue Note)
Cal Tjader – Ode to Billie Joe (Skye)
Ulysses Crockett – Sunshine Superman (Transverse)
Gary Burton – Leroy the Magician (Atlantic)
Milt Jackson – People Make the World Go Round (CTI)
Bobby Christian – Mooganga (Ovation)
Johnny Lytle – Above the Clouds (SS)
Lionel Hampton- Them Changes (Brunswick)
Freddie McCoy – Beans’n’Greens (Prestige)
Soulful Strings feat Billy Wooten – One Night Affair (Cadet)
Cal Tjader – Soul Sauce (Verve)


To hear this mix, head on over to the Funky16Corners Radio Podcast Archive

Greetings all.

How’s by you?
Speaking for myself, a fabulous (yet tiring) weekend was had, beginning with a stellar edition of the Asbury Park 45 Sessions. Nearing our third anniversary as the only all-45 funk/soul night in New Jersey, the 45 Sessions are running at full steam. Heavy sets were dropped by all concerned, especially DJ Prestige and M-Fasis tag teaming on the tables with a set that got the people up and moving.
I was hoping to bring you a live recording of my set, but technical ineptitude on my part (concerning setting the recording source) left me with a live recording of the DJ area, complete with conversations and other random noise running over the music. With any luck I’ll get the whole thing straightened out by the time I spin with DJ Bluewater at Forbidden City in a couple of weeks.
A few weeks back, when we memorialized the late, lamented Freddie McCoy, I mentioned that I was working on a vibes mix, and the sounds you hear today are the results thereof.
The Funky16Corners Radio experience* features mixes arising from varying levels of inspiration, many of them high-concept, long-gestating projects, others whipped together on a moments notice. Today’s edition of the podcast is one of the former.
I’ve been a huge fan of the vibraphone since I first listened to jazz as a kid. Over the years I’ve been lucky enough to see a couple of the masters of the vibes in a live setting, including Milt Jackson and Bobby Hutcherson. The vibes have their haters, mainly people who find the sound too ‘cool’, but I find that the vibraphone produces one of the loveliest, deepest sounds in all of music.
Funky16Corners Radio v.79 includes cuts by some of my favorite players, with some classics, a couple of interesting obscurities. I should also mention, in the spirit of full disclosure, that in addition to the vibraphone, you will also be hearing a couple of other mallet-driven instruments, including the xylophone and the marimba (in a few cases, during the same number).
I can remember the day many years ago when my man Haim first hipped me to Lionel Hampton’s mighty ‘Greasy Greens’. Hampton was one of the true past masters of the vibes, with a career that goes back to the classic Benny Goodman trios, and extended well into the funky 1970s. ‘Greasy Greens’ made a couple of appearances on vinyl, but the ultimate version is the one included here, which was released as a 45 on Hampton’s own Glad-Hamp label. If the groove sounds familiar, it was borrowed by Georgie Woods for the song ‘Potato Salad’.
Roy Ayers is a fave of the rare groove crowd for his 70s stuff, but the selection in today’s mix comes from the early part of his career when he was working as a sideman with pianist Jack Wilson. Their version of Lee Morgan’s ‘Sidewinder’ is a brilliant bit of soul jazz.
I focused on Freddie McCoy in this space a few weeks ago, and promised that I’d include some more of his music in this mix. ‘Peas and Rice’, from 1967 has a goodtime party vibe.
Australian-born vibist Jack Brokensha emigrated to Canada, and eventually crossed the border into Detroit where he found a spot in the Motown organization as one of the storied Funk Brothers. He came to be known as ‘White Jack’ (as opposed to Jack Ashford, who was not…). He recorded an LP with his group the Baroque-adelics (also billed as the Concert Jazz Quartet). ‘Boogaloo’ appeared on that LP, as well as the 45 from which this version was recorded.
The aforementioned Bobby Hutcherson was perhaps the greatest post-bop vibes stylist of the 1960s, the predominant master of the instrument on the Blue Note label, leading many sessions and working as a sideman on countless others. ‘Goin’ Down South’ appeared on his 1970 ‘San Francisco’ album, one of many he recorded in partnership with the great tenor saxophonist Harold Land (who had played alongside trumpeter Clifford Brown in his classic groups). The tune features Hutcherson working on both vibes and marimba. He cooks up a very tasty groove indeed.
Cal Tjader was known primarily as a master of Latin jazz styles, but found time to work in a soulful style as well. He was one of the co-founders of the Skye Label (alongside Gabor Szabo and Gary McFarland) in the late 60s. His cover of Bobbie Gentry’s ‘Ode to Billie Joe’ appeared on his 1968 LP ‘Solar Heat’.
Bay area vibist Ulysses Crockett doesn’t have an expansive discography, but what he did lay down on vinyl is certainly worth hearing. His version of Donovan’s ‘Sunshine Superman’ appeared on the flipside of ‘Major Funky’.
Gary Burton was another one of the great vibists of the 1960s, recording with George Shearing and Stan Getz, but also stretching out into the realm of the avant garde with the likes of Carla Bley. ‘Leroy the Magician’ – complete with breakbeat by Bernard Purdie – appeared on Burton’s 1969 Atlantic LP ‘Good Vibes’.
Milt Jackson was, along with Lionel Hampton the preeminent practitioner of the vibes in the bop era. He was a cofounder of the Modern Jazz Quartet, and appeared on Thelonious Monk’s seminal Blue Note sessions. Like so many of his contemporaries, he took a soulful turn in the 60s and 70s. His version of the Stylistics ‘People Make the World Go Round’ appeared on his 1972 ‘Sunflower’ LP.
Bobby Christian was a versatile instrumentalist who’s career stretches back into the 1930s. He recorded a number of albums as a leader (sought after by exotica/now sound fans) and also worked extensively as a sideman, appearing on a number of Cadet sessions, including albums with the Soulful Strings. He was nearing 60 when he recorded ‘Mooganga’ for his 1970 Ovation LP ‘Vibe-rations’.
Johnny Lytle is known to soul jazz fans for his classic ‘The Village Caller’ and his excellent work for Detroit’s Tuba label in the 1960s. ‘Above the Clouds’, from his 1969 Solid State LP ‘Be Proud’ features Lytle working it out on vibes and xylophone.
Lionel Hampton returns with his funky take on the Buddy Miles classic ‘Them Changes’.
Freddie McCoy’s 1968 ‘Beans’n’Green’ is cut from the same pattern as ‘Peas and Rice’ (aside from the obvious soul food connotations) with an in-studio ‘live’ vibe, handclaps, soul partiers and the lot. The two tracks sound as if they were recorded in the same session, but there was actually five months between the two sessions.
Billy Wooten is known to the crate digger set for his rare and highly sought after LPs with the Wooden Glass and the Nineteenth Whole. He was also a busy sideman, working on a couple of the funkier Grant Green sessions, and with the Soulful Strings. The cut included here, ‘One Night Affair’ appeared on the ‘Soulful Strings Play Gamble Huff’ and includes Wooten with an extended marimba solo.
The closing track in the edition of Funky16Corners Radio is one of the all-time soul jazz/dancefloor vibes classics, Cal Tjader with the legendary ‘Soul Sauce’. Tjader was a masterful player, and manages to really work it out n the vibes while pushing the band to its limits.
As always, I hope you dig the mix, and I’ll be back later in the week with something cool.

Peace

Larry

*Special thanks go out to Mike Karlos of Radio 95X production for putting together that snappy drop you hear midway into the mix.

Example

Check out the Funky16Corners Store at Cafe Press

PPS – Make sure to fall by Iron Leg for some California Garage fuzz!

PPPS Make sure to hit up Funky16Corners on Facebook

Funky16Corners Radio v.76 – One for the Kids

November 15, 2009

Example

Artwork copyright 2009 – Miles Grogan (age 5)

Funky16Corners Radio v.76 – One For the Kids – Funk and Soul for Children of All Ages

Playlist

Rufus Thomas – Do the Funky Penguin Pt1 (Stax)
Shirley Ellis – The Clapping Song (Congress)
Village Soul Choir – A-B-C’s (Abbott)
Freddy & the Kinfolk – The Goat (Dade)
Electric Company feat Morgan Freeman and Bill Cosby – Jelly Belly (WB)
Banana Splits – Doin’ the Banana Split (Kelloggs)
George Semper – Shortnin’ Bread (Imperial)
Bill Doggett – The Worm (Columbia)
Schoolhouse Rock feat. Grady Tate – I Got Six (Capitol)
Guitar Ray – Patty Cake Shake (Hot Line)
King Coleman – The Boo Boo Song Pt1 (King)
JC Davis – Monkey (Chess)
Jerry O – The Funky Chicken Yoke (Boogaloo)
Okie Duke – Chicken Licken’ (Ovation)
Jackson Five – ABC (Motown)
The Philly Four – The Elephant (Cobblestone)
The Unemployed – Funky Rooster (Cotillion)
Lucky Peterson Blues Band – Good Old Candy (Today)
The Portraits – Three Blind Mice (Tri Disc)
Maggie Thrett – Soupy (From Tha Soul)

To hear this mix, head on over to the Funky16Corners Radio Podcast Archive

Greetings all.

I know this may seem a little early for the arrival of the next Funky16Corners Radio podcast, but sometimes it’s just like that.
The roots of this mix go a long way back (maybe a couple of years?) to a suggestion by a regular reader (who’s identity has been lost in the depths of my e-mail account, raise your hand if it’s you…) that I put together a mix of funk and soul tunes for the kids out there (I have two of my own, and I’m sure a lot of you have your own too).
I thought that this was – in the words of the sage Gomez Addams – a capital idea, but like so many of those, it had to bounce around in the back alleys of the windmills of my mind for a while before I finally buckled down and started rummaging around in the crates to make it a reality. The 40th anniversary of Sesame Street kind of gave me a nudge to get this together as well.
Though the idea seemed simple enough, the realization of the concept took a little bit of thought. There were a couple of obvious selections (some of which made it into the mix, some fell by the wayside for a variety of reasons), but I really needed to go through the archive so that inspirado might finally take hold.
The tunes I was looking for needed to be things that would catch the ear of an actual kid (everything herein has been road tested with my three and five year old sons), and would also need to be “safe”, i.e. free of anything obviously inappropriate (please let me know if I missed anything….). I also wanted the contents of the mix to appeal to the young at heart as well, so that if you are so inclined you could cut a rug alongside your progeny.
Back when the theme was first suggested, the first (and at the time, only) record that came to mind was King Coleman’s ‘Boo Boo Song’, a 45 that sent my son into apoplexy the first time he heard it, and I suspect that it would have the same effect on most people, not just kids. When I hit the crates – as is always the case – I leaned in the direction of overkill, pulling all kinds of stuff that I thought might appeal to the younger set. As I worked through an imposing stack of wax – my sons at my side, some things went by the wayside, either because they ended up containing inappropriate content, or because they failed to elicit a positive response from the “focus group”.
Some of it, like the Electric Company and Schoolhouse Rock fell into the ‘purpose made’ category, their soulful and/or funky attributes merely a happy coincidence.
A couple of things in the mix were in fact performed by actual children (the Jackson Five and Lucky Peterson, who was actually five), and several others were based in kids nursery/playground rhymes. Others were just plain fun (the ‘animal’ themed numbers went over especially well with my kids).
I should also mention that the artwork for Funky16Corners Radio v.76 was created by my five year old son Miles. He drew it before I started working on the mix, but I felt it fit the vibe perfectly. With any luck he’ll whip up some covers for future editions of the podcast.
Listen closely for some blasts from your own childhood (anyone else ride for Captain Kangaroo??), and drop me line to let me know how the mix played with the kids in your life. Make sure you pull down the mixed version so you get all the ‘bonus’ material.
I hope you dig it, and I’ll be back later in the week with something more traditional.

Peace

Larry

Example

Check out the Funky16Corners Store at Cafe Press

PPS – Make sure to fall by Iron Leg for some late-period Monkees

PPPS Make sure to hit up Funky16Corners on Facebook

Joe Bataan – Young Gifted and Brown

September 10, 2009

Example

Mr. Joe Bataan

Example

Listen/Download – Joe Bataan – Young Gifted and Brown – MP3

Greetings all.
Here we all are at the end of what has been a very busy week here in the depths of the Funky16Corners compound. Both of the little Corners headed off to school, with the bigger of the two starting kindergarten and the littler one off to preschool (he is most definitely NOT feeling the bus…).
The groovy thing is, they have the same morning session, and they’re out of the house in the morning, which allows me to do crazy stuff like mowing the lawn at 8:05 in the AM in a (successful) attempt to beat the rain. Finished at 8:35, I now settle in at the dining room table with an icebag on my knee, a bottle of water and the laptop, so that I might complete my blogly duties before I continue on with the rest of my responsibilities.
I’d like to thank the good folks at Transition Culture for including me in their nomination for the Kreative Blogger award, which is a kind of continuous, chain-letter-esque bit of what Spy Magazine used to call ‘log rolling’, i.e. passing on a little love in the hopes that the recipient might do the same. The point being expanding the blog-wise knowledge of the readers by hepping them to some sites that I dig, in the hopes that they’ll move along in that direction and cause the ripple in the interwebs to keep moving.
I appreciate the props, and while I hate to be the slob that breaks the “chain”, I show my love in the sidebar (which was recently pruned to remove inactive sites, so that your valuable time might not be wasted). Click on any of the links to the right to see what I dig (and it’s not all funk and soul either).
The tune I bring you today is something I picked up this summer (for a single, crisp dollar!), which quickly flipped my wig and became a solid favorite, Joe Bataan’s ‘Young Gifted and Brown’.
If your not hip, know that Bataan ought to be chiseled into the Mt Rushmore of Latin soul, having made some of the genres finest records over the last 40 years. He’s laid down everything from sweet soul to slamming funk and is still at it today.
‘Young Gifted and Brown’ – which I haven’t been able to nail down a release date for, but suspect something 1971-ish – is a powerful, funky tale (autobiographical?) of empowerment that borrows/paraphrases its title from Nina Simone’s ‘To Be Young, Gifted and Black’. Released on the Fania subsidiary Uptite records, the tune has a killer arrangement and is right for the dance floor.
I hope you dig it, enjoy the weekend and I’ll be back on Monday with something cool.

Peace

Larry

PS Don’t forget to head over to Iron Leg for a couple of tracks from the Chiswick catalog.

PSS Check out Paperback Rider too.

PSSS Don’t forget to hit up Funky16Corners on Facebook

Funky16Corners On the Road (Again)

July 23, 2009

Example

Example

Greetings all.

The end of the week is here, and I am once again a free man. The tube has been removed from my kidney (not as painful as I thought it was going to be) and I am back on the street again.
I’m a little bit behind the eight ball – confinement in a hospital room for the better part of a week kind of takes it out of you – but I fully expect to be up to speed in a few days.
I come to you empty handed at the end of the week because the wife and I spent the entire day on the road retrieving the two smallest Corners from their grandparents who were kind enough to watch them while I was ill. We had to drive to upstate NY, and then took a route home that initially looked like a smart move but turned into a long string of traffic nightmares. We only just rolled through the door about an hour ago, so there wasn’t really time to prepare something (you can always hit the archives and check out a mix you may have missed the first time out).
However, I have some news…
Next week I’ll be packing up the heat (LPs as well as 45s) in the Funky16Corners-mobile and rolling down to Washington, DC for a couple of nights of vinyl goodness.
Next Wednesday, 7/29 I’ve been invited to spin as part of the crew at the 5th Anniversary of DJ Birdman and DC Digga’s night ‘Jazz Corner of the World’ at Café St Ex, 1847 14th St NW in DC. If you dig the sounds of jazz (all kinds, from hard bop to rare grooves) you need to fall by since Birdman and DC Digga know how to do it up right, and there will be other special guests bringing the heat including Richmond, VA’s own DJ Fatback (who knows him some jazz). Things get rolling at 7PM and go all night long.
Then – yes there’s more – on Friday night 7/31 yours truly, Larry Grogan aka Funky16Corners will be working in long form over at Marvin (a very cool place) a few blocks up at 2007 14th St NW (in DC, natch) where I’ll be manning the storied wheels of steel from 10PM all the way to closing time. You can expect the usual funk, soul and rare groove with bits of disco and jazz (anything that moves the dancers) mixed in.
I’m really looking forward to working up a nice, long groove, and I know the folks in DC like to dance, so we should all get along swimmingly.
If you’re in driving distance try to fall by and make the scene one of those nights, and be sure to stop by the booth and say howdy.
That said, have a groovy weekend, and I’ll see you all back here on Monday.

Peace

Larry

PS Don’t forget to head over to Iron Leg for the Second Anniversary Mix! .

PSS Check out Paperback Rider too.

PSSS Don’t forget to hit up Funky16Corners on Facebook

Two Sides Of/By Ramsey Lewis

April 2, 2009

Example

Mr. Ramsey Lewis

Example

Listen – Ramsey Lewis – African Boogaloo Twist – MP3″

Listen – Ramsey Lewis – Ode – MP3″

Greetings all.

The week is done, and I don’t know about you cats, but I’m in the mood for some soul jazz.
Who better to bring the heat, than the mighty Ramsey Lewis.
The tendency among the crate digger types would tend toward taking Lewis for granted, since a lot of his records are incredibly common. Thanks to the success of his version of ‘The In Crowd’ he was a best selling artist for years. Thanks to his own prodigious talent – and an uncanny ability to stay ahead of the stylistic curve – he also produced a grip of high quality music, from swinging mid-period soul jazz like you’ll be hearing today, right on to visionary reimaginings of the Beatles on ‘Mother Nature’s Son’ and then onto the gritty breakbeats of
‘Them Changes’ and then on, and on and on.
‘African Boogaloo Twist’ and ‘Ode’ come from the 1968 LP ‘Maiden Voyage’, and display two sides of an artist in transition. The album includes a couple of pop and soul covers (Manfred Mann, Aretha Franklin) as well as some heavier jazz material, including the Herbie Hancock title cut and a cover of Mike Gibbs ‘Sweet Rain’, previously recorded by both Gary Burton and Stan Getz. Lewis collaborated on the LP with Cadet records visionary Charles Stepney and his touch is most evident on cuts like ‘Les Fleur’ and the mini-epic ‘Ode’.
‘African Boogaloo Twist’ (written by bassist Cleveland Eaton) is classic Lewis with enough heat for the dance floor from Lewis’ piano, some slamming drums and a backing chorus. ‘Ode’ is something else entirely.
The Stepney composition is the kind of lush departure that he and Richard Evans were creating so much of for Cadet in the late-60s. Built on a crystalline string and horn chart, the tune creeps eerily close to easy listening territory before taking a hard left turn into a soulful bit of boogaloo, and then turning yet again (in a wonderful minor chord transition) into a mixture of the two. ‘Ode’ is a great example of the direction Stepney was going in with Rotary Connection, melding soul, jazz and easy sounds into a sophisticated new alloy.
Juxtaposing the two songs you get a good look at how Lewis was able to keep making groove oriented crowd pleasers and still stretch out, and no matter how much of a spread that was, it was still all Ramsey Lewis music at the end of the day.
I hope you dig the tunes, and I’ll be back on Monday.

Peace

Larry

PS Don’t forget to head over to Iron Leg for a taste of Freak-Canuck-Beat.

PSS Check out Paperback Rider too.

PSSS Don’t forget to hit up Funky16Corners on Facebook

Brothers Two – Boogaloo (Soul) Party

February 24, 2009

Example

Listen – Brothers Two – Boogaloo (Soul) Party – MP3″

Greetings all.

The middle of the week is here, the day of hump and all that and what better way to roll the rock to the top (and unlike Sisyphus, get it on over) that a solid shot of raving, funky Phildelphia soul.
Back in the day, when I was experiencing the first signs of a serious Philly soul fixation I was scouring the crates and grabbing pretty much everything I could find on Philly (and Philly associated) labels.
Crimson was neither the greatest, nor the most prolific of the local companies, but their short discography is packed with high quality (sides by Lee Andrews and the Hearts, and one of my fave Philly 45s by the Common Pleas), and at least one huge hit, ‘Expressway to Your Heart’ by the Soul Survivors.
One of the first post-Soul Survivors Crimson 45s I grabbed was ‘Boogaloo (Soul) Party’ by the Brothers Two. I picked this up blind (deaf) in the pre-portable days, but honest to god, how could I miss with a title like that. It was as if Brothers Two and the folks at Crimson looked into the future, saw goofballs like myself browsing through piles of old 45s and gave the song a name so obviously soulful, that only the densest rube would pass it by.
Good thing too because when I got it home and let the needle hit the wax I discovered a high energy soul duo working it out on one of those patented 60s soul namecheck-o-rama’s (like ‘We Got More Soul’ or ‘Sweet Soul Music’) in which the Brothers Two (James Tindal and Eddie Smalls) pay tribute to Aretha Franklin, James Brown, Stevie Wonder, Sam and Dave (natch), Jackie Wilson, and Wilson Pickett, all the while wailing away against some solid drums and a tight horn section.
When I was researching this post I discovered that there were in fact three 45s by the Brothers Two, two of which I do not own and will now have to make it my business to track down.
As it is, I hope you dig the one I did find, and I’ll be back on Friday with something extra cool.

Peace

Larry

PS Don’t forget to head over to Iron Leg for some arty late 60s pop

PSS Check out Paperback Rider which has finally been updated.

PSSS Don’t forget to hit up Funky16Corners on Facebook

2/20 Asbury Park 45 Sessions Wrap Up

February 21, 2009

Example

Example

Listen – Memphis Black – Why Don’t You Play the Organ Man – MP3″


Joe Cuba Sextet – El Pito (Tico)
Nanette Workman – Lady Marmalade (Pacha)
Albert King – Cold Sweat (Stax)
Apostles – Six Pack (Kapp)
Tony Newman – Soul Thing (Parrot)
Establishment – House of Jack (King)
Rex Garvin & the Mighty Cravers – Raw Funky (Uptown)
Lionel Hampton – Greasy Greens (GladHamp)
Memphis Black – Why Don’t You Play the Organ Man (Ascot)
Martinis – Hung Over (Bar)
Big John Hamilton – Big Fanny (SSS Intl)
TSU Toronados – Play the Music Toronados (Volt)
Meters – Look Ka Py Py (Josie)
Soul Tornados – Crazy Legs (Westwood)
BW Souls – Marvin’s Groove (Round)
Hank Ballard – Butter Your Popcorn (King)
Mohawks – Champ (Philips)
Freddie Scott & his Orchestra – Pow City (Marlin)
Donald Austin – Crazy Legs (Eastbound)
Gayletts – Son of a Preacherman (Steady)

Greetings all.
Last night marked the two year anniversary of the Asbury Park 45 Sessions. There was a nice turnout on a positively frigid night. No matter, we were all inside the lanes, insulated from the Arctic winds, heating up the joint with stacks of smoking OG soul and funk 45s with sets from DJ Bluewater, Jack the Ripper, MFasis, DJ Prestige, DJ Prime Mundo and yours truly.
It was – as always – a gas.
Those of you south of the Mason Dixon line who seek a similar form of succor should be alert, since DJ Prestige and myself will be hitting the road in a few weeks to bring the AP45 vibe down to Washington DC (Fri 3/6) and Richmond, VA (3/7). More detailed info as the dates get closer.
I’ll leave you with a repost of a tune from a few weeks back.
See you on Monday.

Peace

Larry

DJ Prestige Setlist

Intro: Rudy Ray Moore – This Pussy Belongs To Me/Kent
The New Birth – You Are What I’m All About/ RCA
Myron & E with the Soul Investigators – Cold Game/ Timmion
Mophono – Tighten Up Remix/ CB
Wilmer Alexander & the Dukes – Get It (Instrumental)/ Aphrodisiac
We The People – Breakdown/ Davel
Brother Soul – Feelin’ Funky/ Elmcor
The DT6 – Don’t Doubt Me/ Starla
Jessee Gresham Plus 3 – Shootin’ the Grease/ Head
Creative Funk – Funk Power/ Creative Funk
Soul Searchers – Blow Your Whistle/ Sussex
Roger Collins – She’s Looking Good/ Galaxy
The Emperors – Karate/ Mala
Alvin Cash & the Registers – Philly Freeze/ Mar-V-Lus
Willie & the Mighty Magnificents – Funky (8) Corners Pt. 1/ All Platinum
The Joe Cuba Sextet – Sock It To Me/ Tico
Wee Willie Mason – Funky Funky (Hot Pants)/ Jay Walking
Wilbur Bascomb & The Zodiacs – Just a Groove in “G”/ Carnival
Pamoja – Oooh, Baby/ Lotus Land
The Boys In the band – Sumptin’ Heavy/ Spring
El Michels Affair – C.R.E.A.M./ Truth and Soul

DJ Prime Mundo Setlist

quincy jones – money runner (reprise)
syl johnson – let them hang high (twinight)
howard tate – look at granny run run (verve)
pieces of peace – pass it on pt. 1 (twinight)
the sylvers – stay away from me (pride)
julius brockington – this feeling (freedom) pt. 1 (burman)
rufus thomas – funky bird (stax)
frederick II – groovin’ out on life (vulture)
wisdom – nefertiti (adelia)
sons of slum – right on (stax)
della reese – compared to what (avco)
reginald milton – clap your hands (funk45)
jomo – uhuru (african twist) (checker)
the hidden cost – bo did it (marmaduke)
sharon jones – how long do i have to dub for you? (daptone)
quantic/flowering inferno – juanita bonita (tru thoughts)
u roy – tide is high (state line)
garry davis & the vendors – funk machine (20th century)
tnt band – the meditation (cotique)
sam hutchins – dang me (gap)
alice clark – you got a deal (rainy day)
jimmy hughes – i’m a man of action (fame)
funkadelic – better by the pound (westbound)

DJ Bluewater Set List

sugarman 3 – solid funk
sugarman 3 – funky so and so pt. 1
brother williams – cold sweat
lee fields – give me a chance
the collegiates – red beans and rice
delores ealy – honeydripper
marva whitney – unwind yourself
dee dee gartrell – second hand love
a.b. skhy – camel back
eddie bo & inez cheatham – lover and a friend
the dirte four – on the move
the grips – tennessee strut
honey & the bees – baby do that thing
delores ealy – its about time i made a change

PS Don’t forget to head over to Iron Leg

PSS Check out Paperback Rider which has finally been updated.

Joe Cuba RIP

February 18, 2009

Example

The always stylish Joe Cuba Sextet

Example

Listen – Joe Cuba Sextet – Psychedelic Baby (You’re Psychin’ Up My Mind) – MP3″

Listen – Joe Cuba Sextet – El Pito – MP3″

Listen – Joe Cuba Sextet – Que Son Uno – MP3″

Greetings all.

I had something else planned for the end of the week, but then the sad news that the mighty Joe Cuba had passed on hit the interwebs and I was duty bound to mark said passing.
If you’re a fan of boogaloo/Latin soul, then the sounds of the Joe Cuba Sextet loom very large. Cuba (born Gilberto Calderon in 1931) made some of the greatest party starters in the genre, including the 1966 hit ‘Bang Bang’ (Top 40, Top Ten in many markets), and my personal boogaloo fave, ‘El Pito’.
The tunes I’m posting today include ‘Psychedelic Baby (You’re Psychin’ Up My Mind)’ – which appeared here a few weeks back, ‘El Pito’ (which was included in Funky16Corners Radio v.51 – Spanish Grease, originally posted back in June of ’08) and a track that that’s never been posted here at the blog, a taste of the mellower side of Joe Cuba, ‘Que Son Uno’.
They’re all quite groovy.
I hope you dig the sounds, and that you raise a glass this weekend in memory of one of the true greats of Latin soul, Mr. Joe Cuba.

Peace

Larry

Example

PS Don’t forget that this Friday night (2/20) marks the return of the Asbury Park 45 Session at the World Famous Asbury Lanes in (where else) Asbury Park NJ. If you’re withing driving distance you’d do well to fall by, soak up the heat of funk and soul on 45, and if you’re hungry, you can soak up some tater tots and beer too.

Example

Also, leep in mind that the Funky16Corners Radio Show on Viva internet radio returns tonight – Thurs 02/19 at 9PM . The show will play at 9PM, and will be archived thereafter at the Funky16Corners Radio Show Page (where you can still hear many old shows if you haven’t checked it out yet).

PS Don’t forget to head over to Iron Leg

PSS Check out Paperback Rider which has finally been updated.

Funky16Corners Radio v.65 – The Return of Secret Agent Super Funky16Corners

February 15, 2009

Example

Funky16Corners Radio v.65 – The Return of Secret Agent Super Funky16Corners

Playlist

Brian Auger & Julie Driscoll – Indian Ropeman (Polydor)
Peddlers – Last Train To Clarksville (Philips)
Joao Donato – Lunar Tune (Blue Thumb)
Louis Prima w/ Sam Butera & the Witnesses – Pick Up the Pieces (Pr1Ma)
Neal Creque – Bacalau (Cobblestone)
Joe Thomas Group – Comin’ Home (Cobblestone)
Richard Groove Holmes – Isole Natale (World Pacific Jazz)
Eddie Jefferson – Freedom Jazz Dance (Muse)
Mongo Santamaria – Night Crawler (Atlantic)
Enoch Light & the Light Brigade – Season of the Witch (Project 3)
New London Rhythm & Blues Band – Soul Man (Vocalion)
Reuben Wilson – Superfly (Groove Merchant)
Don Ellis – Put It Where You Want It (Columbia)
Joe Thomas Group – You Can Bet Your Sweet Bippy (Cobblestone)
Tamba 4 – California Soul (A&M)

To hear this mix, head on over to the Funky16Corners Radio Podcast Archive

Greetings all.

I hope that the beginning of a new week finds you all well, and ready to dig into a big, steaming dish of funky, jazzy and all together groovy.
This is kind of a companion mix/flipside, yin to the yang, of Radio v.64, in which the downtempo vibe was explored. This time around there are a few of the same artists, the tempo is decidedly up, with a similarly jazzy bent.
I actually put a little more work on this mix than usual, working my way through two distinct versions, adding a few tracks here, subtracting a few there until the original vibe I sought was finally there.
The first track is a stone killer, and if it doesn’t get you up out of your seat, in your embroidered djebella, doing that Playboy After Dark uptown hippie frug, then you need to hit the pause button, go fill up on the stimulant of your choice, and then fall back into line for a second helping. ‘Indian Ropeman’ is Brian and Jools taking a Richie Havens tune and gassing it up to the nth degree with the Hammond, the drums and bass and the strobe light (you can hear it if you listen closely), and it is a thing of beauty. Definitely an automatic lead-off track is there ever was one.
We follow it up with a little stick of dynamite from the Monkees catalog. If that sounds a little weird, give the track a listen because only Roy Phillips and the Peddlers can take a bit of pure pop like ‘Last Train to Clarksville’ and apply the bang pow – like the kick of defibrulators – shifting into jazz rock overdrive, also with the groovy Hammond.
Things take a tiny step down with something funky from Joao Donato. ‘Lunar Tune’ (from the LP ‘A Bad Donato’) is more of that groovy Brazilian keyboard action that we’ve come to expect from Mr Donato.
If you were given pause when you saw the name Louis Prima in the playlist, rest easy. I would not steer you wrong, and Mr. Just a Gigolo and his band were recording funky, era-appropriate grooves well into the 70s on his own Pr1ma label. Their take on the Average White Band’s ‘Pick Up the Pieces’ goes into synthesizer overload and features some very snappy drums.
Keyboardist Neal Creque (who appears in this mix as a leader, and as a sideman with Mongo Santamaria) lays down a very nice Rhodes groove with his tune ‘Bacalau’.
Joe Thomas is well known to crate diggers, for his increasingly funky work in the 60s and 70s on the soul jazz tip (if you find a copy of ‘Chitlins and Cuchifritos’ on Today, grab it). His smoking flute-heavy take on Bob Dorough and Ben Tucker’s ‘Comin’ Home’ is a smoker from the get go.
Richard Groove Holmes was one of the great past masters of the Hammond, and should be a very familiar name to followers of Funky16Corners Radio organ mixes. ‘Isole Natale’ is from his uniformly excellent 1969 LP ‘Working On a Groovy Thing’ which also features an interesting cover of David Frishberg’s ‘Oklahoma Toad’.
If you’re not ready to have your mind blown, take a break and come back in a minute. Eddie Jefferson was featured in this space recently, but that track was a mere amuse bouche when compared to the jazz funk buffet of ‘Freedom Jazz Dance’. As close to a modern jazz standard as you can get (written by Eddie Harris, covered by Miles Davis among others), ‘FJD’ is given a fiery vocalese reworking by the legendary Mr. Jefferson.
Layin jazz genius Mongo Santamaria recorded a number of funky albums during his late 60s/early 70s tenure at Atlantic Records. ‘Night Crawler’ is from his ‘Mongo ’70′ LP and is one of the few tracks on the album not written by Neal Creque (it was penned by Charles Williamson).
Next up is an unusual cut from Enoch Light. Known mainly for his “easy” sound LPs for the Project 3/Command labels, crate diggers in the know will tell you that his albums are an untapped source of funky sounds. One such cut is his fuzzed out, drum heavy take on Donovan’s oft-covered ‘Season of the Witch’.
I’ve owned and treasured the New London Rhythm and Blues Band LP for years – real heads do in fact know the deal – and despite mining the intertubes for information I have yet to figure out who’s playing on it. My suspicions have always been that it was UK studio/library heads, but I have yet to receive confirmation in that regard. Their booming, atmospheric take on ‘Soul Man’ is a gas.
Hammond heads will already be hip to the keyboard work of Mr Reuben Wilson, from his early days as part of the Wildare Express, right on through his solo albums for Blue Note and Groove Merchant. Dig his very funky take on Curtis Mayfield’s ‘Superfly’.
Don Ellis was an unusual cat. He had a long career writing and performing experimental jazz, yet by the late 60s his big band was playing rock covers on the stage at the Fillmore West. His cover of the Crusader’s ‘Put It Where You Want It’ is from the band’s last Columbia LP, 1972′s ‘Connection’ which also featured a cover of Yes’s ‘Roundabout’.
We go back to Joe Thomas with another smoking cut from his ‘Comin’ Home’ LP on Cobblestone. ‘You Can Bet Your Sweet Bippy’ is a powerfully swinging number with some shout outs in the breaks that older heads will recognize as references to ‘Laugh In’.
We close out this edition of Funky16Corners Radio with a tune that was featured by itself last year. Tamba 4′s version of ‘California Soul’ is from sessions for an LP that was never issued. ‘California Soul’ was released on a rare, promo-only 45, and is one of my favorite versions of the tune.
That all said, I hope you dig the mix, and I’ll be back later in the week with something soulful.
Peace

Larry

PS Make sure to stop by Iron Leg for some classic, mid-60s folk rock perfection.

PSS Check out Paperback Rider as well

Joe Bataan – Latin Strut

January 15, 2009

Example

Example

Joe Bataan

Example

Example

Listen – Joe Bataan – Latin Strut – MP3″

Listen – Deodato – Super Strut – MP3″

Greetings all.

I hope the end of the week finds you well.
I stand before you on the cusp of some major (I think positive) changes in my life. I won’t go into too much detail today, on account of not having a whole lot of time today, but I will explain at length come Monday. Rest assured that these changes should not affect the blog(s) in any negative way. If anything the supply of good vibes is likely to expand.
That said, I’ve enjoyed serving up the sizzling Latin soul this week, and the tune I’ve held for last is a banger.
Though this was the ‘Week of Boogaloo’, today’s selection falls far outside that time period. Though not technically ‘boogaloo’, it is certainly Latin soul, so my hope is that once you pull down the unos y ceros you’ll dig the connections (and the tune).
As I’ve said before, I’m in no way an expert on Latin sounds, but I am a big fan. My Latin crates aren’t particularly deep, but I like to think that they contain a fair amount of quality. I’m always on the lookout for new stuff (not “new”, but new to me), and today’s selection is a fairly new addition to the Funky16Corners arsenal.
Last year, thanks again to a sale list from my man Haim, I happened upon a copy of Joe Bataan’s ‘Latin Strut’. This is one of those records that I’d never heard, but certainly heard about for a long time. As soon as I checked out a sample, I slapped down the semolians and before long the disc found its way through the mail slot and the air in things at the Funky16Corners compound were a little bit groovier.
Joe Bataan is one of the major movers and shakers of Latin soul, from the early years of boogaloo and coining the term Salsoul in the 70s.
It was on the album bearing that title in 1974 that he dropped today’s selection, ‘Latin Strut’.
Now, if you’re a regular reader of Funky16Corners, you know that I’m the kind of nut who spends at least as much time reading record labels as I do spinning the records. Oddly enough, I gave ‘Latin Strut’ a grip of spins before I stopped to scan the label, so imagine my surprise when I look under the song title expecting to see the words ‘Joe Bataan’, and instead the name Deodato pops out at me.
“Huh?”, says I, seconds before I set to Googling and discovered that ‘Latin Strut’ was in fact a cover of a Eumir Deodato tune entitled ‘Super Strut’. Naturally, it wasn’t long before I grabbed a copy of the OG (it was but a pittance) because I couldn’t very well tell this particular tale without including both 45s.
Deodato’s original is certainly “Latin” in it’s conception, if a tiny bit jazzier with the Rhodes laid on thick (which is cool). Joe Bataan cranks up the Latin percussion, amplifies the tempo a touch for the dancers and opens things up with a very sweet flute solo. It also helps that about two thirds of the way through ‘Latin Strut’ there resides a very nice drum/bass breakdown.
Though apparently (according to the excellent book ‘Love Saves the Day’) ‘Latin Strut’ didn’t make a big impression on the Latin audience, it should come as no surprise that its pre-disco vibe was a major hit on the dance floors of New York City.
I hope you dig the records, and I’ll be back on Monday with something nice.
Have a great weekend.

Peace

Larry

PS Don’t forget to head over to Iron Leg for some 6T’s Canadian rawk…

PSS Check out Paperback Rider which has finally been updated.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 110 other followers