Archive for the ‘Iron Leg’ Category

Funky16Corners Radio v.71 – Getting the Corners

June 28, 2009

Example

Funky16Corners Radio v.71 – Getting the Corners
The Highlighters Band of Indianapolis, Indiana!

Playlist

Highlighters Band – The Funky 16 Corners Pt1 (Jazzman)
Richard Marks – Funky Four Corners (Roulette)
Tommy Wills – (Funky) 4 Corners (Airtown)
Lee Dorsey – Four Corners Pt1 (Amy)
Willie & the Mighty Magnificents – Funky (8) Corners Pt1 (All Platinum)
Jerry-O – Funky Four Corners (White Whale)
Maurice Williams and the Zodiacs – The Four Corners (Veep)
TSU Toronadoes – Getting the Corners (Atlantic)
Willie & the Mighty Magnificents – Funky (8) Corners Pt2 (All Platinum)
Lee Dorsey – Four Corners Pt2 (Amy)
Highlighters Band – The Funky 16 Corners Pt2 (Jazzman)

To hear this mix, head on over to the Funky16Corners Radio Podcast Archive

Greetings all.

Here’s hoping that everyone is finally enjoying their summer.
It’s been a busy week hereabouts, less to with the blog than the real world moves. Nothing serious, just stuff.
That said, by the end of the week things – blogside – got quite busy as I foolishly sat down and decided to put together (and write up) two podcasts, one for Funky16Corners and one for Iron Leg (If you dig fuzzed out 60s pop, make sure you check it out). As a result I find myself here (on Saturday) marching through a marathon writing session, all the while digi-ma-tizing new vinyl arrivals and keeping an ear peeled for the napping three year old in the other room.
The new edition of the Funky16Corners Radio Podcast that I bring you today – the seventy first – started to come together a month or so ago when my man Tony C hepped me to the quality of a record that I had heard of, but never actually heard, that being ‘The Four Corners’ by Maurice Williams and the Zodiacs. Now, as is evidenced by the title of this very blog, I have an interest in the “corners” sub-genre of funky 45s, so much so that I’ve endeavored to pick them up wherever I find them.
Oddly enough, of all the funk/soul dances namechecked in the records of the day, the execution of ‘The Four Corners’ (and all exponential variations herein) wasn’t all that mysterious, being a fairly simple hip-thrust to the points of the compass, multiplied when deemed necessary by the man on the record. In addition to the records included in this mix (and some I’m sure I have yet to hear) that use a ‘corners’ dance in the title, there are scores of others that drop the name of (usually) ‘The Four Corners’ in the standard listing of the popular dances of the day, a list that almost always included the Boogaloo, Philly Dog, Camel Walk, Boston (or other regional) Monkey on and on ad infinitum.
Having christened this blog after one of the truly great funk 45s, ‘The Funky 16 Corners’ by the Highlighters Band, in which the original dance is squared (though not a square dance), I bring you today a collection of variations on the theme (as the longhairs once said), every last one a seriously funky record.
Things get started (of course) with the Highlighters Band and the original (though not an original 45…I wish*) and ‘The Funky 16 Corners’. This is nothing if not a virtuoso performance by the band, led by vocalist James Bell, who having decided to double down (and then again) on the corners, absolutely tear up the joint. One can only imagine the looks on the dancers in the room when they went into that sixteen hit breakdown near the end of part one, many of them sprawled on the floor with lower back injuries. The mix is set up so that with all the two part records (there are three of them), you get the first part, and then the second part drops at the other end of the mix in descending (ascending??) order (i.e., the Highlighters Band Pt1 is first, and Pt2 is last), so stay tuned for the rest of the record.
Next up is Atlanta area funkster Richard Marks with the ‘Funky Four Corners’ on Roulette (originally on the ATL label Tuska). ‘Funky Four Corners’ was the second of his four 45s for Tuska (and as far as I can tell the only one to be picked up nationally) , and while I haven’t heard the other three, I can’t imagine they all kick ass as soundly as this one.
I have a couple of 45s by Ohio saxophonist Tommy Wills in the crates, but his ‘(Funky) 4 Corners’ is a recent discovery. According to the Buckeye Beat web site, Dayton (and later Richmond, IN) based Airtown was Wills label. He recorded four 45s for the label, releasing ‘(Funky) 4 Corners’ in March of 1968. While the fidelity may not be high (is there such a thing as “half-a-mono”?) energy and funk are in high gear. The flip side of this one is a nice version of Aretha’s ‘(Sweet Sweet Baby) Since You’ve Been Gone’.
The next record has appeared in this space before, but honestly, could I do a mix like this and leave out Lee Dorsey’s unfuckwithable ‘Four Corners’? Written and produced by Allen Toussaint, and rumored to feature none other than James Black on the drums (how about those breaks?) ‘Four Corners’ is one of the great New Orleans funk 45s. I mean, in addition to all those drums, you get to hear Lee testify with the “SHAKE-A MAKE-A BREAK-A HULA” and the “FOUR CORNERS BABY!”. It bears mentioning that ‘Four Corners’ is one of a couple of 45s in this mix that owe a serious debt to Archie Bell and the Drells’ ‘Tighten Up’. Whether this has to do with that particular record being especially suited to doing the “four corners”, I cannot say for sure.
Next up is New Jersey’s own Willie and the Mighty Magnificents, taking things to the next level with the ‘Funky (8) Corners’. Led by Willie Feaster, the Mighty Magnificents laid down some very tasty 45s (and a couple of LPs) for All Platinum between 1968 and 1972. ‘The Funky (8) Corners’ opens up (and continues) with some heavy drums, sampling once again from the ‘Tighten Up’ template, with a very tasty horn chart and all manner of dance floor/craze jive from Feaster and company.
If you fall by here on the reg you already know that I ride for the work of Mr. Jerry Murray (known to his friends as Jerry-O) in a big way. His entire career was built almost entirely on dance craze records, and ‘Funky Four Corners’ is the funkiest and most storming of them all. His White Whale era (most of which were originally issued on Murray’s Boo-Ga-Loo imprint) is by far his heaviest stuff (including a funk version of Paul Williams old school R&B chestnut ‘The Hucklebuck’) and should be grabbed whenever located in the field.
Maurice Williams and the Zodiacs made their first, biggest (and almost only) assault on the charts in 1960 with ‘Stay’. Of course if you’re only going to hit once, it helps if you do it with a certifiable rock’n’roll classic. They kept recording through the 60s for a variety of labels (including the New Orleans imprints Deesu and Sea-Horn), recording ‘Four Corners’ for Veep in 1969. The funk of ‘Four Corners’ is light years beyond ‘Stay’, with a whole lot of grit and the complete absence of falsetto vocals.
The ‘Tighten Up’ connection gets a whole lot closer, with a number by the band that provided the (uncredited) backing on the original Archie Bell hit, the TSU Toronadoes. ‘Getting the Corners’ is a not so distant cousin of the original “source document” with a somewhat funkier beat. They namecheck the ‘four corners’ throughout with some nice drum breakdowns and a horn line that borrows from ‘The Horse’
The final three tracks in the mix are the second parts of the Willie and the Mighty Magnificents, Lee Dorsey and Highlighters Band 45s, all significantly lighter on the vocals than their respective a-sides, all worth grooving to.
I hope you dig this edition of Funky16Corners Radio, and I’ll be back on Friday with something to close out the week.

Peace

Larry

*Though my Jazzman reissue is autographed by two members of the band, so that’s cool too…

PS – Make sure to fall by Iron Leg for new fuzz pop mix

PSS Make sure to hit up Funky16Corners on Facebook

Advertisements

F16C Meets IL #4 – Lorraine Ellison – Stay With Me

June 25, 2009

Example

Miss Lorraine Ellison

Example

Example

Listen -Lorraine Ellison – Stay With Me – MP3

Go to Iron Leg to hear the version by Terry Reid

Greetings all.

The end of another week approaches and although there’s s summery touch of humidity hanging in the air the sun is still as elusive as ever. I suppose I’m going to have to find a way to deal with this, but it’s still a drag.
Today sees another installment of the recurring features known as the Intersection of Funky16Corners and Iron Leg. The last time we did this, back in March of this year it was devoted to two versions (one soul, one rock) of the classic Ed Cobb tune ‘Every Little Bit Hurts’ (by Brenda Holloway and the Spencer Davis Group). This time out sees a similar juxtaposition with two different versions of a song from the catalog of one of the great geniuses of 60s soul, Mr. Jerry Ragavoy.
If the name is not familiar, get down into the crates and start checking the fine print on your record labels, since Ragavoy was the composer, arranger and producer of some of the finest soul records ever made, among them Erma Franklin’s ‘Piece of My Heart’, Howard Tate’s ‘Get It While You Can’ (a personal fave), Garnett Mimms’ ‘Cry Baby’, Irma Thomas’s ‘Time Is On My Side’ and today’s selection ‘Stay With Me (Baby)’ (the “baby” in parentheses since the song is billed with and without it).
The best known version of this song, by the mighty Lorraine Ellison is rightly regarded as a high point in the history of classic soul ballads. As the story goes, Ragavoy brought Ellison into the studio in early 1966 to take advantage of some orchestra time left over from a cancelled Frank Sinatra session.
Ellison’s recording, like so many of Ragavoy’s creations is a sublime mixture of gospel inflected soul with touches of R&B grit. The “build” of the song is much like that of ‘Cry Baby’, with a slow, drawn out verse building into a dynamic, nearly overpowering chorus. The lyrics are a heartbreaking plea to repair a shattered love and Ellison’s delivery, especially during the chorus where she soars into the stratosphere (vocally and emotionally) is brilliant.
It wasn’t that long ago when I was digging down south during a DJ trip and I uncovered a copy of Terry Reid’s 1969 self titled LP. Reid was a UK rock wunderkind of sorts (making his first record at 15) , highly regarded in his homeland, known amongst the heads stateside, but never really breaking through in a big way. He is best known as having reportedly turned down the chance to front both Led Zeppelin (the original) and Deep Purple (replacing Rod Evans). He recorded a number of LPs in the late 60s under the aegis of popmeister Mickie Most, the finest of which was the aforementioned ‘Terry Reid’.
Reid was possessed of a raw tenor reminiscent of – yet more subtle than – Steve Marriot. Reid often worked in a stripped down, power-trio (with embellishments) format. While in the hands of others this was applied with the delicacy of a sledgehammer, Reid exercised a fair amount of taste and restraint, actually arranging his songs where other would have buried them in a stone wall of power chords.
Reid’s style was never better than in his own version of ‘Stay With Me Baby’ (which you can hear over at Iron Leg) which is in its own way, every bit the epic that Ellison’s better known recording.
Opening with a spare drum and bass combo, followed by a crashing wave of Hammond organ, Reid opens the verse with his voice playing against the sparest of accompaniment, hi-hat and drum stick rapping against snare rim, bass and a barely audible, almost funereal organ in the background. He sings in a delicate, near-falsetto, only introducing the rasp into his voice as he escalates the volume going into the chorus. There are those who might see what I’m about to say as sacrilegious, but I’d be willing to say that Reid’s version of ‘Stay With Me Baby’ is every bit the emotional, dare I say soulful tour de force of Lorraine Ellison’s, and in some ways, thanks to the rough backing (stripped of the orchestral embellishment) exceeds it in some ways.
As much as I love Ellison (her ‘Call Me Any Time You Need Some Loving’ and ‘Try Just a Little Bit Harder’ are big faves of mine), I find myself returning to Reid’s version much more often. That said, both versions are worth hearing, and I hope you dig them.
If I can get my act together I may roll back in here on Monday with a new edition of the Funky16Corners Radio Podcast. Until then, have a most excellent weekend, and I’ll see you all then.

Peace

Larry

NOTE: Don’t forget to fall by Viva Internet Radio Tonight at 9PMEST for the latest edition of the Funky16Corners Radio Show. You can always check out the show (and many pastshows) in the archive.

Example

PS Don’t forget to head over to Iron Leg to hear the version by Terry Reid.

PSS Check out Paperback Rider too.

PSSS Don’t forget to hit up Funky16Corners on Facebook

Woody Carr – Peace Dance

November 13, 2008

Example

Woody Carr and a later band…

Example

Listen – Woody Carr – Peace Dance – MP3″

Greetings all.

Today’s selection is something of a Funky16Corners/Iron Leg collabo-thingy, in that part of today’s IL post is an earlier, stylistically different 45 by Woody Carr (as well as another 45 tangentially related to that one). You should head on over there and check it out when you get a sec.
That out of the way, the tune I bring you today – in this space – is a very groovy, very moody and somewhat funky side from 1968, entitled ‘Peace Dance’.
Woody Carr is a longtime Pacific Northwest singer, who recorded with his band the Entertainers and as a solo in the mid-to-late 60s for the Jerden and Picadilly labels. Though the 45 with the Entertainers is pretty conventional 1966 rock/pop, ‘Peace Dance’ (from 1968) is something else entirely.
First off, how some enterprising soul hasn’t gotten their hands on this 45, and chopped and looped it into something with the hip to the hop to the wikki wikki, I do not know. All I know is that the drum and bass breakdown in this tune is shweeet (not to mention the ill horn stabs) , and then Woody comes in with the soulful vocals, and THEN, about halfway through the song he takes a minute to drop a little topical 1968-osity into the mix – with the Abraham Lincoln “sample” and all of a sudden the whole deal gets a little far out.
And I dig it.
The cool thing, is that this is record that the crate diggeur-ati would refer to as “slept on”, which means not a whole lot of people know about it, and as a happy result it should be gettable at a reasonable price (which of course you ought to do post haste, so that it might be whipped on the crowd at your next potato chip and ripple party).

Stay well and I’ll be back on Monday.

Peace

Larry


.

PSS Don’t forget to head over to Iron Leg for some more Woody Carr as well as a very, VERY tasty bit of garage folk

PSSS Check out Paperback Rider as well.

Funky16Corners Radio v.60 – Finger Lickin’ Good b/w 4th Anniversary Mix!

November 5, 2008

Example

Funky16Corners Radio v.60 – Finger Lickin’ Good!

Playlist

Louis Chachere – The Hen Pt1 (Paula)
James Brown – The Hen Pt1 (King)
The Meters – Chicken Strut (Josie)
Willie Henderson & the Soul Explosions – The Funky Chicken Pt1 (Brunswick)
Clarence Wheeler & the Enforcers – Broasted or Fried (Atlantic)
Jerry O – The Funky Chicken Yoke (Jerry O)
Unemployed – Funky Rooster (Cotillion)
Okie Duke – Chicken Lickin (Ovation)
Rufus Thomas – Do the Funky Chicken (Stax)
Mel Brown – Chicken Fat (Impulse)
Lou Garno Trio – Chicken In the Basket (Giovannis)
Chants – Chicken and Gravy (Checker)
Art Jerry Miller – Finger Licken Good (Enterprise)
Bobby Rush – Chicken Heads (Galaxy)
E Rodney Jones & Larry & the Hippies Band – Chicken On Down (Double Soul)
NY Jets – Funky Chicken (Tamboo)
Radars – Finger Licken Chicken (Yew)*
*Bonus Platter
Andre Brasseur – The Duck (Palette)
Butch Cornell Trio – Goose Pimples (RuJac)
Nie Liters – Serenade To a Jive Turkey (RCA

To hear this mix, head on over to the Funky16Corners Radio Podcast Archive

Greetings all.

This edition of Funky16Corners Radio – the 60th?!?!? – marks an even more unlikely event, that being of the completion of the fourth year in the existence of this very blog, and thanks to a wonderful bit of synchronicity, the beginning of a new era in the United States.
Back in November of 2004, when I started the Funky16Corners Blog, I had no inkling that I’d still be at it four years down the pike.
If statistics are any indication, the average life of most blogs is between two and three months, which makes Funky16Corners something Methuselah-esque. If there’s any key at all to its longevity, it would be that I enjoy doing it. As anyone that reads the posts here can tell you, I’m a busy guy, with the job, and the little kids and all the rest of the accoutrements of life in the suburbs (though those that know me would be hard pressed to describe me as typical in that regard).
That said, I started blogging as a way to redistribute the amount of work I was doing on the Funky16Corners web zine, which preceded the foundation of the blog by another four years. My oldest son had just been born, and I wanted to keep writing about music, so I figured that if I broke the work down into bite-sized pieces, that I could continue to do so without running myself ragged.
Needless to say, that hasn’t always been the case.
However, it didn’t take much time before I realized how addictive this enterprise would be. The blog provided an outlet for my writing, then a few years on to my compulsive mixology, and thanks to a largely cordial and appreciative audience I often learn as much as lay out.
That aspect of the blog has been among the most rewarding. In addition to shout outs from folks who just dig hearing the music, I really dig hearing from other collectors who help flesh out the sometimes sketchy bits of information that I’m able to gather. Along those lines – and especially rewarding – are the notes from artists and their friends and families saying how much it means to see that someone still appreciates the music.
Thanks to the blog, I’ve met some very cool people, first and foremost my man DJ Prestige, founder of the Asbury Park 45 Sessions, the all-45 DJ night that I’ve been a contributor to for almost two years.
I’ve been writing about music on the fringes for more than two decades. I started my first zine, Incognito, back in 1985, when it was all manually cut and pasted, and then taken to the copy shop and Xeroxed. A few years later I purchased my first computer (an Apple Performa 200) and entered the world of desktop publishing. My second zine, Evil Eye was a somewhat more sophisticated affair, with scans and tons of crazy fonts, but as before, it all ended up at the copy shop, as did my jazz zine, Gone which I started in 1997.
During the late 80s I spent some time doing freelance writing for the paper where I still work today, doing occasional feature pieces, as well as a column in one of our weekly products that lasted for a little over a year. Though the experience was rewarding, I soon discovered that I wasn’t going to be able to write the way I wanted in a regular paper, so back I went into the underground.
It wasn’t until the late 90s, after a friend at work gave me a rudimental working knowledge of Front Page, that I first set foot onto the interwebs, with the web zine version of Gone (traces of which still remain in the ether). It wasn’t too long after that, that work started on the Funky16Corners web zine.
The web zine (which is still maintained as the Web Zine Archive) went on for 13 issues, and if you take the time to stop by you’ll find lots of interesting feature articles, discographies and interviews.
When I started the blog, it was not – as it would soon be – devoted to the sounds of soul and funk. In fact, the earliest posts on Funky16Corners closely resemble a format that would be resurrected in 2007 in my other blog, Iron Leg.
Though my first intent in blogging was to keep writing, the unintended by product, and probably the most interesting aspect of the whole deal is how it has taken my record collection and turned it from a room full of inanimate objects into a living, breathing thing. The collection has continued to expand unabated for many years, and more often than not, as new material has made its way into my life, it has also appeared in this space, and conversely, as things have been blogged about, my interests, and the variety of the music I dig for has expanded (and continues to grow), so the influence travels in both directions. The process of relating stories about the music I love, has expanded my collection, and the process of expanding my collection (and the knowledge associated with it) has enriched the blog.
A happy little circle to be sure.
The mix I bring you today, in celebration of the anniversary, and of the people that stop by here on the reg, was in fact suggested a while back (more than a year of memory serves, and sometimes it doesn’t) by a reader. When I decided to finally get this mix together, I went back into the vast heap of e-mail, but was unable to locate the original suggestion. Aside from the fact that it was a regular reader/commenter, I can’t remember who made the suggestion of an “all-chicken” mix, and for that I am remiss and I apologize (but still say Thanks!).
So, the “all chicken’ mix (or mostly chicken with a bonus side of poultry) is here. You might have seen some of these tunes here before (in fact you definitely have), but never before gathered together in the henhouse, or better, cooking in the frying pan and hitting the table alongside some greens, mac and sweet potato pie. Fried chicken may be the soul-iest soul food of all (apologies to the vege-ma-tarians), and I thought about making this mix ‘Soul Food Pt3’ but then I figured that with the hyphens and the subtitles and what not the name would never fit, so ‘Finger Lickin’ Good!’ it is.
That said, I want to thank those of you that have been coming here for a while, and say welcome to those that just started falling by. With any luck, we’ll still be here next year. As far as I know you can’t get laid of from the blog-o-mos-phere (not yet anyway).
I’ll be taking the rest of the week off to hit the road with the F16C fam. We’re going for some west and wewaxation.
I’ll see you all on Monday.

Peace
Larry

PS Make sure to stop by Iron Leg …

PSS Check out Paperback Rider as well

Funky16Corners Meets Iron Leg #4 – Gilberto Gil – Aquele Abraco

August 26, 2008

Example

Gilberto Gil

Example

Example

Listen – Gilberto Gil – Aquele Abraco – MP3

Greetings all.
I figured after beginning the week out with a soul stormer, that I’d follow it up with something unusual. I’ll be featuring one side of a 45 here at Funky16Corners and the other side over at Iron Leg.
I’ve been a fan of Brazilian music for as long as I can remember, beginning with bossa nova and moving on to Tropicalia and MPB about ten years ago, when I picked up a Caetano Veloso compilation CD and was blown away by the tunes ‘Tropicalia’ and ‘Superbacana’.
Up to that point, though I had heard of both Veloso and Gilberto Gil, I had no inkling that such a treasure trove of amazing music existed.
I won’t go too deeply into the cultural implications of the Tropicalia/Tropicalismo movement (more on that here), since I’m far from an expert. The short story is that in the midst of an actual revolutionary movement in the Brazil of the mid-to-late 1960s, there was also a musical revolution, in which artists like Veloso, Gil, Gal Costa, Tom Ze, Os Mutantes, Rogerio Duprat, and Nara Leao mixed native Brazilian rhythms, samba, and bossa nova with contemporary pop music, resulting in an absolutely brilliant, often psychedelic sound.
After digesting the Veloso comp, I started nosing around and before long I was ordering expensive Brazilian reissues of albums from the Tropicalia movement, among them the monumental 1967 self-titled LP by Gilbert Gil (the one with ‘Coragem Pra Suportar’ as close to a South American ‘Revolver’ as you’re likely to hear).
Not long after Tropicalia exploded on the scene in Brazil, both Veloso and Gil were arrested, jailed and eventually exiled (temporarily) by the military government. They both recorded albums while living in the UK before returning to Brazil in 1972.
The track I bring you today was Gil’s first real hit in Brazil, and appeared on his 1968 (pre-exile) LP ‘Gilberto Gil’ (aka Cérebro Eletrônico). The first time I heard ‘Aquele Abraco’ I pretty much fell in love with the song (and never thought I’d score a copy of the 45). Gil wrote the tune (the title loosely translated as ‘That Embrace’) as a love song to Brazil, including shout outs to influences like Dorival Caymmi (who came – like Gil – from the state of Bahia and just passed away a few weeks ago) and Joao Gilberto and his contemporary Caetano Veloso. ‘Aquele Abraco’ is an incredibly infectious record, and a great example of the samba-heavy end of the Tropicalia sound. The rest of the LP (and I’d heavily recommend any of his albums from the late 60s/early 70s) runs the gamut from psychedelic pop to electronic experimentation.
Today, Gilberto Gil is something of an elder statesman, serving as a cultural minister in Brazil. He and Veloso both continue to record and perform today.
I hope you dig the track, and make sure you all head over to Iron Leg to check out the much more psychedelic flipside of this 45
I’ll be back before the weekend with a hot new mix for the Labor Day weekend.
Peace
Larry

Example

*The 45, which I believe is a Chilean issue spells both songs differently than their listings on the ‘Gilberto Gil’ CD reissue, so I decided to defer to the LP spelling, thus the different title in the label scan above.

PS Head over to Iron Leg for the flipside of this very 45.

PSS Check out Paperback Rider too…

Bobo Mr Soul – Answer To the Want Ads

March 19, 2008

Example

Beau Williams aka ‘Bobo Mr. Soul’

Example

Listen – Answer To the Want Ads – MP3″

Greetings all.

I hope the middle of the week finds you well, and fully satisfied by this Monday’s edition of Funky16Corners Radio.
This will very likely be the last post this week (maybe until next Tuesday), as the fam and I are heading out on the road for some well-deserved rest and relaxation. It’s been a little while since our last getaway so we’re good and ready to do a little touring. Of course I expect that I may – intentionally or not – find my way into a record shop of some kind (and I always do, don’t I??), so hopefully in addition to letting off some steam I’ll also be harvesting some new sounds for inclusion in this space.
Today’s selection is another in a long tradition of what we in the record collecting world (and elsewhere I’m sure) know as an “answer record”.
In the case of Bobo Mr. Soul’s ‘Answer to the Want Ads’, it earns that designation both literally and figuratively.
Bobo Mr. Soul – whose real name is Beau Williams – was a Houston, TX based singer who recorded two 45s for the storied Ovide label (also home to the TSU Tornadoes) in the early 70s. ‘Answer to the Want Ads’ was his first, released in 1971 as an answer to – wait for it, here it comes – ‘Want Ads’ by the Honey Cone, which was a Top 10 hit in the spring of that year.
The Bobo Mr. Soul 45 – The flipside of which, ‘H.L.I.C.’ was featured a while back in a mix over at Fleamarket Funk – unlike some “answer” records, uses almost the exact same melody as the original, setting it up almost as a second chapter of the Honey Cone’s saga.
Williams second 45 for Ovide, ‘Hitchhike To Heartbreak Road’ was issued a second time, on the Hi label in 1972. That tune, written by Phillip Mitchell and originally recorded by Curtis Wiggins was redone (with the same backing track) by Williams. Though it didn’t have any success on the charts, that record has gone on to be a fave with soul fans in the know.
Williams soon dropped the ‘Bobo Mr. Soul’ pseudonym and became a star in the world of gospel under his own name.
I hope you dig it, and that you all have a great weekend.
I’ll see you next week.

Peace
Larry

PS Check out Iron Leg for some Garage Punk by the Gentrys

PSS It’s just a little over a week until the return of the Asbury Park 45 Sessions. This time out the resident selectors will be joined by Dan of the Budos Band. It’s gonna be hot!!

Example

F16C Meets IL #3 – Every Little Bit Hurts

March 12, 2008

Example

Miss Brenda Holloway

Example

Example

Listen – Brenda Holloway – Every Little Bit Hurts “

Greetings all.

I hope the middle of the week finds you well, and well on your way to the weekend.
Today’s post is another chapter in self-collaboration (sounds vaguely immoral) between my two blogs, Funky16Corners and Iron Leg.
This time out, the “intersection” is rooted in a recent dig, wherein I swooped down on an unsuspecting antique store – where I was surprised to find a large quantity of vinyl (much of it Liberace and related) – and pretty much cleaned it out over the course of two days.
This is not to suggest that I hit the motherlode – there was a lot (a LOT) of garbage as well as some really poorly treated records there – but that I did get to do some serious digging, and in said dig managed to unearth a bunch of common stuff that I didn’t already have, as well as a couple of nicer things.
After I got my records home and started to explore via the turntable, I discovered two versions of an excellent song (by Brenda Holloway and the Spencer Davis Group), one of which I’m featuring here, and the other which has been simultaneously posted over at Iron Leg.
Brenda Holloway has been featured at Funky16Corners before, and in all likelihood will appear here again, as she was the possessor of a truly wonderful voice.
As an example of Motown performers of the 60s, Holloway is kind of an anomaly. Unlike the vast majority of the label’s acts, she hailed not from Detroit, but from California. She was discovered by Berry Gordy while performing at a radio industry convention in Los Angeles.
She had been recording, in groups, duos and as a backing vocalist for a number of local labels before signing with Motown in 1964. During her few years with the Motown organization she recorded two albums and several singles (all for the Tamla subsidiary) before leaving the recording industry at the end of the decade, due in large part to a feeling that she hadn’t been given the attention she deserved as an artist*.
The song we feature today, ‘Every Little Bit Hurts’ takes Holloway another step further from the Motown machine as it was written by Ed Cobb, who is best known for writing and producing ‘Tainted Love’ for Gloria Jones, as well as numerous sides for the Standells and the Chocolate Watchband.
Holloway originally recorded ‘Every Little Bit Hurts’ for the Del-Fi label in 1963. When she rerecorded it for Tamla in 1964 backing vocals were provided by her sister Patrice and the aforementioned Gloria Jones.
Holloway’s version of the tune opens with someone sawing at a string bass (listen closely as it’s kind of an incongruous sound) before settling into the flow of the tune. Holloway’s vocal is (as usual) outstanding, and the song, which would be covered numerous times, is one of my favorite soul ballads of the 60’s.
‘Every Little Bit Hurts’ went on to be a Top 20 hit in 1964, and Holloway went on to be the co-write and record ‘You’ve Made Me So Very Happy’ (later a huge hit for Blood Sweat & Tears) as well as opening for the Beatles on their 1965 US tour.
After parting ways with Motown, Holloway didn’t record as a solo artist until returning as a gospel singer in the 80’s.
That all said, I hope you dig the tune, and make sure to fall by Iron Leg for a taste of the Spencer Davis Group working the same song.
Peace
Larry

Remember to head over to Iron Leg for a cover of ‘Every Little Bit Hurts’ by the Spencer Davis Group!

Iron Chef Funky16Corners…

March 3, 2008

Example

Today’s Mystery Ingredient! RARE GROOVES!!!!

Greetings all.

I hope all is well on your end.

I’m kind of – but not quite – taking the day off (at least here) as I am answering the invitation of the mighty Soul Chef, Vincent, proprietor of Fufu Stew, to serve up a guest mix. Vincent has been running a series of such mixes (the most recent one, by DJ Bluewater is a stone groove), and he asked me to bring a hot dish to the table (it ought to be up over there by Monday morning).

What I’ve done is blended the Funky16Corners and Iron Leg vibes to cook up a mix that I call

‘Outta Sight: aka Mancini King of Monsters!’.

There’s a lot of Now Sound, many breaks (of course), some soul jazz and even a soupcon of disco, all masterfully seasoned, put briefly under the broiler and brought to your table sizzling and ready to eat.

So head on over to Fufu Stew, check out my mix, and make sure you stick around and sample Vincent’s excellent home brewed mixes.

I’ll be back on Wednesday with some more grooviness

Peace
Larry